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Neither here nor there

To my amazement, waking early, then doing a medium amount of work on Project A, then a small amount of work on Project B, seems to be working. (On weekends I do a large amount of Project A, and stick with small amounts on Project B.)  Sea of Tranquility is

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Reading into a new year

A couple of days ago I began reading The Fifth Season, the first novel in N.K. Jemisin's Broken Earth trilogy. I'm feeling very late to this series; seems as if everyone's already read it, and here I am, just beginning. But I like that books are patient; they'll wait

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Patience, writer-person

This might be some of the best writing advice I've ever read. Don't rush your thinking. Don't rush to make sentences. —From Several Short Sentences About Writing by Verlyn Klinkenborg

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The glass station

I'm having a curious reading experience: This week I began Emily St. John Mandel's The Glass Hotel, which tells the story of a financial con artist and the people in orbit around him. At the same time, I began watching HBO's Station Eleven, which is an adaptation of Mandel's previous,

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Favorite reads, 2021 edition

Since 2015, I've been tracking my reading habits on this web site. Each year about this time, I look over everything I've read and select five-ish standouts. It's not easy selecting just five books when you read, you know, more than five books. In 2021, I read 117 books or

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Glowing pixels

I have a soft spot for small games. By that I suppose I mean games that are built by small teams, that attempt to do something unique. One of my favorites of the last few years was Firewatch, a visually delicious and narratively fascinating game about a troubled guy spending

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General systems collapse

Apparently in the Late Bronze Age, starting about 1,500 years before the Christian era, the Eastern Mediterranean region was characterised by a system of centralised palace governments, which redistributed money and goods thorugh complex and specialised city economies. I read about this on Wikipedia. Trade routes were highly developed

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Epistolary novels

An epistolary novel is a novel written as a series of documents. The usual form is letters, although diary entries, newspaper clippings and other documents are sometimes used. Recently, electronic "documents" such as recordings and radio, blogs, and e-mails have also come into use. —WikipediaEpistolary novels are, in my experience,

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A book for me

Now and then, a book isn't for me. That's kinder to say, I think, than This book is bad. As an author myself, I've heard Your book is bad plenty of times, and no matter the reason behind it, it never feels nice. The book I finished reading recently wasn't

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The books on my desk

A couple of years ago, taking a cue from Austin Kleon, I squeezed a second desk into my study. In Steal Like an Artist, Kleon wrote: I have two desks in my office—one is “analog” and one is “digital.” The analog desk has nothing but markers, pens, pencils, paper,